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Ryan Garza, Detroit Free Press

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‘Brotherhood’ ever tops the agenda for 2nd Ebenezer’s male-mentoring program

Mentor Harold Lasenby, 54, speaks during a gathering of the Circle of Brotherhood at the Second Ebenezer Church in Detroit on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022. The program particularly targets an at-risk group: young Black men in the city of Detroit. The program has positively impacted the lives of more than 850 young men and counting.
Mentor Harold Lasenby, 54, speaks during a gathering of the Circle of Brotherhood at the 2d Ebenezer Church in Detroit on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022. The programme particularly targets an at-risk group: young Black men in the city of Detroit. The program has positively impacted the lives of more than than 850 young men and counting.
Annie Barker, Detroit Gratuitous Press

During Harold Lasenby’s loftier school days, he became well acquainted with an aging, viii-floor building — affectionately known to many as the “pickle manufacturing plant” — which housed Cass Technical Loftier School.

And when the 1985 graduate was not in the classroom, Lasenby usually was flashing his skills with a bat and glove as a member of the Cass Tech varsity baseball squad.

Like Lasenby, Nigel Baker is proud to rock the Technicians’ greenish and white. However, when in-person classes are in session, Baker, a 16-year-old junior, gets to walk the halls of a vii-story, modern structure of glass, steel and brick that opened in 2005 at the corner of Henry and 2d Avenue, where the sometime pickle factory one time stood. Baker, as well, is a student-athlete at Cass, but soccer — not baseball — is his sport of pick.

A street sign at the corner of Dequindre and E. McNichols honors the contributions of Bishop Edgar L. Vann to the surrounding community and the city of Detroit.  The Circle of Brotherhood male-mentoring program inspired by Vann at Second Ebenezer Church has positively impacted the lives of more than 850 Detroit youth since 2007.
A street sign at the corner of Dequindre and E. McNichols honors the contributions of Bishop Edgar 50. Vann to the surrounding community and the city of Detroit. The Circle of Brotherhood male person-mentoring program inspired past Vann at Second Ebenezer Church has positively impacted the lives of more than than 850 Detroit youth since 2007.
Scott Talley, Detroit Costless Press

Simply where Lasenby’s and Bakery’southward worlds truly come together is through a shared approach to the game of life, which has been molded through their participation in the Circumvolve of Alliance (COB), a male-mentoring program provided by Second Ebenezer Church building located in the North Campau neighborhood of Detroit at 14601 Dequindre, just south of Half dozen Mile.

Celebrating the mentoring plan’south 15th ceremony, the COB mentors and mentees proudly tell a story of “doing work” that has touched the lives of more than 850 young men, xc% of whom have gone on to college or merchandise school. The group reports that approximately 350 adult mentors accept been a part of this effort, which has been committed to “helping today’s young men meet the challenges of an e’er-changing social club through spiritual, emotional, mental and personal-life-skills development.”

A jacket with the group emblem is worn by a member during a gathering of the Circle of Brotherhood at the Second Ebenezer Church in Detroit on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022. The program particularly targets an at-risk group: young Black men in the city of Detroit. The program has positively impacted the lives of more than 850 young men and counting.
A jacket with the group keepsake is worn by a fellow member during a gathering of the Circle of Brotherhood at the Second Ebenezer Church in Detroit on Tuesday, Feb. fifteen, 2022. The program especially targets an at-chance grouping: young Black men in the city of Detroit. The program has positively impacted the lives of more than 850 young men and counting.
Annie Barker, Detroit Free Press

Prior to entering Cass at the first of the current school year, Baker faced “challenges,” to say the least. He carried a grade point average considerably beneath a 2.0 for a fourth dimension while he was attending University Prep Scientific discipline & Math High School. During that period, Baker had even taken to playing the grade clown, but he said he had not lost his nobility or ability to learn. Instead, he said his actions reflected an earlier loss in his life that he had no reply for; that is, until Lasenby and COB filled the void.


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“2015 was my worst year
ever
because my grandmother passed away; information technology hurt me really bad,” said Baker, who has been a part of COB for four years. “I closed myself in. I stopped playing sports for about two years. And I got the worst grades that I take e’er had. I didn’t remember I could ever open myself back upwardly and trust anything, until I met Mr. Harold. He believed in me and I opened up to him nearly things I went through.”

Baker confided that Lasenby — the baseball guy and die-hard Golden State Warriors fan — found a way to talk to him passionately nigh soccer, in between stressing the importance of educational activity and the demand for a life plan. The talks somewhen led to action from Baker, who lifted his grades to a loftier accolade roll level at University Prep, which ultimately enabled him to transfer to Cass, where he also found the school soccer team.

Since 2007, the Circle of Brotherhood male-mentoring program at Second Ebenezer Church has connected adult mentors with local youth consistently for nine months each year.
Since 2007, the Circle of Brotherhood male-mentoring program at Second Ebenezer Church building has connected adult mentors with local youth consistently for nine months each yr.
Photo courtesy of Harold Lasenby

“He (Lasenby) helped me with so much that I can never repay him for it. I’yard just glad that he’s my mentor now,” said Baker, who stood before his mentors, parents and fellow mentees on Tuesday evening at Second Ebenezer and confidently spoke well-nigh his desire to be all he can be in soccer and graphic blueprint.

Lasenby, 54, says he is equally proud and humbled to have been a mentor to Bakery and hundreds of other young men since COB’s inception. The day before Baker stood in the centre of the group’s circle at Second Ebenezer, Lasenby got high-strung up while sharing his own story about getting a second take chances equally a business organization possessor with the assist of a benefactor from Jackson, Michigan. Twenty years later that 2d chance, Lasenby is still the boss of his own business organization headquartered in Corktown, equally the CEO of Space Technologies LLC, an Information technology service and back up house that specializes in security surveillance. And in Lasenby’southward universe, being the co-manager of COB and existence the caput of a Detroit-based, minority-owned business are completely connected.

“The young men I take mentored expect like me and they grew upwards in the aforementioned kind of neighborhoods that I did, so I tin provide a living, animate example that a Black homo from Detroit can observe success in this city,” said Lasenby, the pride of Mack and Fairview, who attended Scripps Unproblematic and Butzel Centre School before heading off to Cass Tech for loftier school.

Mentor Anthony Rogers, 61, speaks during a gathering of the Circle of Brotherhood at the Second Ebenezer Church in Detroit on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022. The program particularly targets an at-risk group: young Black men in the city of Detroit. The program has positively impacted the lives of more than 850 young men and counting.
Mentor Anthony Rogers, 61, speaks during a gathering of the Circle of Brotherhood at the Second Ebenezer Church building in Detroit on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022. The program particularly targets an at-risk group: young Black men in the city of Detroit. The program has positively impacted the lives of more 850 immature men and counting.
Annie Barker, Detroit Gratuitous Press

At the request of 2d Ebenezer’due south senior pastor, Bishop Edgar L. Van II, Lasenby and Anthony Rogers took on lead roles in creating COB. 15 years later, Vann says he is more than than pleased with the programme Lasenby and Rogers have shaped.

“Anthony and Harold are two potent men, and I knew both had a centre for helping young men,” Vann said of the gentlemen who launched a program that engages mentees nine months of the year. “Programs have been the hallmark of our ministry for many, many years. And customs needs have increased due to the pandemic. COB was 1 of the first groups within our church that pivoted during the pandemic so that the program wouldn’t skip a vanquish. There was no time off — everything else, except our worship services stopped at one point. Simply the men leading COB had no desire to stop or quit.”

Mentor Harold Lasenby, 54, speaks during a gathering of the Circle of Brotherhood at the Second Ebenezer Church in Detroit on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022. The program particularly targets an at-risk group: young Black men in the city of Detroit. The program has positively impacted the lives of more than 850 young men and counting.
Mentor Harold Lasenby, 54, speaks during a gathering of the Circumvolve of Alliance at the Second Ebenezer Church building in Detroit on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022. The program specially targets an at-risk grouping: young Blackness men in the city of Detroit. The plan has positively impacted the lives of more than 850 young men and counting.
Annie Barker, Detroit Free Press

Vann said fully understanding what COB is all well-nigh first requires a true understanding of mentoring.

“If your program is simply based on kids having a expert time, that is non a mentoring program,” Vann said with conviction. “This is not about taking a group of kids to McDonald’s or Belle Isle. It takes long-term engagement for long-term results. At that place are good immature men everywhere, but many don’t have a foundation. COB offers a compassionate, but rigid, arroyo to providing a foundation for a young Black homo. And because COB has continued to impact so many immature men, it automatically blesses the city of Detroit considering these young men live in Detroit; they become to schoolhouse in Detroit; and they walk the streets of Detroit. Their lives have been made exponentially better and the city of Detroit is amend for it.”

Earlier the pandemic, mentoring washed the COB way too involved a host of enrichment activities abroad from 2nd Ebenezer, including trips to higher campuses and even New York’due south business districts, all gratis of charge to the mentees. Merely while travel and in-person meetings accept been severely limited for COB during the by 24 months considering of the COVID-nineteen pandemic, through frequent Zoom calls, the group has continued to address critical issues, as Jeremy Rogers explained during a Valentine’s Day Zoom phone call that brought mentors and mentees together.

Mentee Lance Johnson, 13, speaks during a gathering of the Circle of Brotherhood at the Second Ebenezer Church in Detroit on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022. The program particularly targets an at-risk group: young Black men in the city of Detroit. The program has positively impacted the lives of more than 850 young men and counting.
Mentee Lance Johnson, 13, speaks during a gathering of the Circle of Brotherhood at the Second Ebenezer Church in Detroit on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022. The program especially targets an at-risk group: immature Black men in the urban center of Detroit. The program has positively impacted the lives of more than than 850 young men and counting.
Annie Barker, Detroit Free Press

“Some of the topics we have gone through include thought process and feelings; deportment and reactions; human relationship building; tolerance and peer pressure level; and a lot of discussions nearly decision making,” said Jeremy Rogers, who has been a COB mentor for x years. “We’ve also had sessions where we talked near alcohol and drugs and had older mentors tell their testimonies. … Where nosotros have evolved would include covering topics like social media and fifty-fifty how to handle and deal with law enforcement.

“And at present a big function of what nosotros offer is our tutorial plan. We have a very dedicated tutor (Lynita Taylor) who comes in every session and assists our young men.”

The day subsequently laying out some of COB’s contempo calendar issues, Jeremy Rogers spent a part of his 36th birthday speaking directly and bluntly to three young men in the programme: Sean McSpadden Jr., 16; Cordell Walton II, xiv; Lance Johnson, 13, and Baker, who were function of the circle gathering at Second Ebenezer.

Without any notes, Jeremy Rogers showed his undeniable familiarity and concern for the young men as he inquired almost issues relating to their progress in school and life. The “COB is for life” mentality that Jeremy Rogers displays, fifty-fifty on holidays and birthdays, has caused Anthony Rogers to apply his “You Got Side by side” label to Jeremy, significant Anthony envisions a 24-hour interval when Jeremy volition pb the entire COB show. Merely most immediately after delivering that praise, Anthony Rogers makes it articulate that COB still has an enormous, positive concur on him too.

Mentee Sean McSpadden Jr., 16, speaks during a gathering of the Circle of Brotherhood at the Second Ebenezer Church in Detroit on Tuesday, Feb. 15, 2022. The program particularly targets an at-risk group: young Black men in the city of Detroit. The program has positively impacted the lives of more than 850 young men and counting.
Mentee Sean McSpadden Jr., 16, speaks during a gathering of the Circle of Brotherhood at the 2nd Ebenezer Church in Detroit on Tuesday, February. 15, 2022. The program peculiarly targets an at-risk grouping: young Black men in the metropolis of Detroit. The program has positively impacted the lives of more than than 850 young men and counting.
Annie Barker, Detroit Costless Printing

“My hereafter goal was to open up up a charter school, only God gave me a school correct hither — Circle of Brotherhood,” Anthony Rogers, who Lasenby reverently calls the “the spirit of COB,” said. “This is all almost life. And the dazzler of this is that it’s non just one man, it’south a collective endeavour. Everyone steps upward where there is a need. When we practise sessions, we follow a curriculum, but it’south really whatever God gives us. It’south the mood of the brothers at that time — whatsoever is on the brothers’ minds and hearts; it takes over and there we become, it takes us on a journeying.”

Scott Talley is a native Detroiter, a proud production of Detroit Public Schools and lifelong lover of Detroit civilization in all of its various forms. In his second tour with the Costless Printing, which he grew upward reading equally a child, he is excited and humbled to encompass the city’south neighborhoods and the many interesting people who define its various communities. Contact him at: stalley@freepress.com or follow him on Twitter @STalleyfreep. Read more of Scott’s stories at www.freep.com/mosaic/detroit-is/.

Source: https://www.freep.com/mosaic-story/news/local/detroit-is/2022/02/18/second-ebenezers-male-mentoring-program/6828850001/