Ef 35 70mm F 3.5 4.5

By | 09/11/2022

Standard lens mountain on the Canon EOS family

Canon EF mountain
Canon EF lens mount.jpg

The electronic contacts (gold-plated) of an EF mount lens.

Type bayonet
Inner diameter 54 mm
Flange 44 mm

The
EF lens mount
is the standard lens mount on the Catechism EOS family unit of SLR film and digital cameras. EF stands for “Electro-Focus”: automatic focusing on EF lenses is handled by a defended electric motor built into the lens. Mechanically, it is a bayonet-style mount, and all advice between camera and lens takes identify through electrical contacts; there are no mechanical levers or plungers. The mount was outset introduced in 1987.

Canon claims to accept produced its 100-millionth EF-series interchangeable lens on 22 April 2014.[1]

History

[edit]

Number of Canon EF lenses sold over fourth dimension (red), compared with Nikon F mount lenses (blue)

The EF mount replaces its predecessor, the FD mount. The standard autofocus lens mounting applied science of the time used a motor in the photographic camera body to drive the mechanics of the focus helicoid in the lens past using a transfer lever. The key innovation of the EF series was to use a motor inside the lens itself for focusing. This allowed for autofocusing lenses which did not crave mechanical levers in the mount mechanism, only electrical contacts to supply power and instructions to the lens motor. The motors were designed for the particular lens they were installed in.

The EF mount reversed the mechanical logic of the FD mount. The FD mount provided the 3-eared bayonet fitting on the camera body, and each FD lens provided a breech-lock receptacle to register and spike the lens to the bayonet. The EF mount reverses this logic, providing the bayonet on each lens, and a receptacle on the photographic camera torso.

The EF mount also changed the logical clamping action of the bayonet receptacle to meliorate the tactical operation. Attaching an FD lens to a camera torso required ii hands: one to concur the lens in position, and a second to twist the breech-lock ring to rigidly lock the lens to the photographic camera. The EF mount instead provides leaf springs in the receptacle, which concord the registration surfaces of the lens and receptacle together along the optical axis, while the manual twisting action engages a spring-loaded registration pivot in the receptacle which drops into a recess provided on the bayonet fitting, locking the rotation. This EF mount characteristic provided the convenience of attaching EF lenses with i manus (belongings the lens and twisting), versus 2 hands (ane to hold the lens, ane to twist the breech-lock) required for the FD attachment. An EF lens may likewise exist removed with 1 hand past gripping the base of the lens and pressing the nearby release push with the tip of thumb. The i-handed expert operation of the EF mount allows irresolute lenses in handheld photography, since the other hand is freed to agree the camera body.

When the EF mount was introduced in 1987, it had the largest mount diameter (54 mm internal) among all 35 mm SLR cameras.[ii]

The EF series includes over eighty lenses, encompassing focal lengths from 8 to 1200 mm. Many EF lenses include such features as Canon’due south ultrasonic motor (USM) drive, an epitome stabilization organisation (IS), diffractive optics (Do) and, particularly for 50-series lenses, fluorite and aspherical lens elements.

Versatility

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Electronics of an EF-S lens

Its large diameter and relatively short flange focal altitude of 44.0 mm allows mechanical adaptation of EF camera bodies to many types of non-EF lenses.[iii]
Information technology is possible to mount lenses using the Nikon F mountain, Olympus OM, Leica R and universal M42 lens mounts (among others) past the employ of a mechanical adapter without electronic command of the aperture or autofocus. In contrast, parfocal adaptation of EF lenses to non-EF camera bodies is non possible with only a mechanical adapter that does not contain optical elements.

EF mount lenses are somewhat uniform with newer Canon bodies, though the reverse is not true:

  • EF-S lens mountain cameras tin mount EF lenses without an adapter
  • EF-M lens mount cameras tin mount EF lenses with an EF-EOS M adapter[4]
  • RF mountain cameras can mountain EF lenses with a variety of adapters

Lenses for the before Catechism FD lens mount are not usable for general photography on an EF mount cameras, unless adapters with optical elements are used because they are made for a flange focal distance of but 42.0 mm. Most of these lenses require autofocus and aperture motors inside the body which isn’t available in EOS bodies. Infinity focus would be lost with an adapter which lacks optical elements. The Canon FD-EOS adapter is rare and is only usable with certain FD telephoto lenses. With a manual connectedness, the aperture and focus controls of the lens cannot be controlled or read from the photographic camera; the lens must be focused manually. Since the only possible metering is through-the-lens, the lens must be manually stopped down to accurately meter at anything less than full aperture. (This is called stop-down metering.)

Third-party lenses

[edit]

Compatible third-political party lenses with the EF lens mount are manufactured past Yongnuo, Samyang, Schneider, Sigma, Tamron, Tokina, Cosina and Carl Zeiss. The manufacturers of these lenses accept reverse engineered the EOS electronics—except Zeiss, which does not have the rights to use the autofocus or the electronic discontinuity control of EOS cameras[
commendation needed
]
. The use of these tertiary-party lenses is non supported by Canon. Sometimes compatibility problems arise, as no third party has access to Canon’s specifications for camera-to-torso communication.[5]
These compatibility issues mostly occur when using a newer torso with an older third-political party lens. Over fourth dimension, most of these issues have been resolved by the major third-party brands.

3rd-party cameras

[edit]

Due to the high market penetration of EF-mountain lenses, other photographic camera manufacturers began to offer EF-mount cameras. Since the EF-mountain was created for SLR cameras with their long focal flange distance, mirrorless interchangeable-lens cameras tin employ EF lenses with a mechanical adaptor that bridges the distance.

Cherry Digital Cinema Company offers various camera models that tin can be equipped with an electronic EF-mount. Many Blackmagic Design cameras are sold in EF-mount variants. For Sony E-mount various adaptors enable using EF-mountain lenses with full electronic command.

Controls and features

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An EF lens showing its different controls and features

Canon EF lenses typically have a number of controls, switches and physical features, used past the photographer to control the lens. The types and number of the controls tin vary from lens to lens. With the most basic lenses having but a few, to the virtually complex having over a dozen unlike controls and switches.

This is a listing of the different controls and switches constitute on about Canon EF lenses, forth with a detailed description on what they are used for.

Lens mount index:
This raised, round red marking is found on all EF lenses. Information technology is used for matching the EF lens mountain to the mount on an EOS body, then one can connect the lens to the body rapidly.

Focusing band:
This control, found on most EF lenses, is used for focusing the lens. It is ordinarily a ring on the lens body, that tin be turned.

Zoom band:
This control is found on virtually EF zoom lenses. Information technology is used for changing the focal length of the lens. The zoom ring commonly has certain, mutual, focal lengths marked on it. To set the zoom ring to whatsoever given focal length, i must turn the ring so that the marked focal length matches the zoom index. The zoom alphabetize is typically a white, or blackness, line found next to the zoom band.

Distance scale of an EF lens

Altitude scale window:
This characteristic is found on many EF lenses. This feature, while not a command or switch, is useful to the lensman for determining, or setting, the lens’south focus distance. Information technology is used in conjunction with the
Focusing ring. When rotated, the distance calibration volition also rotate to bear witness the changing focus distance. On some lenses the altitude scale as well has an infrared index. These are shown as red markings below the distance calibration. This is used for making focus adjustments when the lensman is doing infrared photography, as lenses typically focus infrared light at a different signal than visible low-cal, and therefore achieving correct focus using visible light will result in an out-of-focus infrared prototype. To brand an aligning, first focus the bailiwick, then turn the
Focusing band
and then it matches the corresponding infrared index mark.

Focus way, and focusing range switches

Focus mode switch:
This switch is found on most EF lenses that take an autofocus feature. Information technology is used for setting the lens to either autofocus mode, or transmission focus. When set up to autofocus mode (AF), the lens will autofocus when directed to past the photographic camera. When prepare to manual focus (MF), the lens is focused using the
Focusing ring. Some lenses support full-fourth dimension manual focusing (FT-M), which allows the lensman to focus the lens manually even with the manner switch set to AF, without damaging the lens (as could happen if a lens without FT-M is manually focused while in AF mode).

Focusing altitude range limiter switch:
This switch is found on almost longer focal length lenses, and macro lenses. It is used for limiting the focusing distance range of the lens when using it in autofocus mode. Most lenses take two settings; these are ordinarily full focus range (from minimum focus distance to infinity), and afar focus range (from halfway point of focus range to infinity). Other lenses have three settings, with the additional setting usually existence near focus range (from minimum focus altitude to halfway betoken of focus range). Longer focal length lenses and macro lenses have a relatively long travel distance for the focusing mechanism inside the lens; this feature shortens the autofocus time. When the photographer knows they will not need a certain part of the focus distance range, limiting information technology will assist shorten the autofocus time, and possibly forestall “focus hunting”.

Soft focus ring:
This ring is establish just on the 135 mm ‘Soft Focus’ prime number lens, and enables a variable soft focus result from completely sharp (0) to very soft (two), although it has little issue when used with apertures over f/5.vi. Although the ring tin can be set to any position, two ‘stops’ are implemented at positions 1 and ii.

Both types of image stabilizer switches

Image stabilizer switch:
This switch is found on all EF lenses that feature an prototype stabilizer. It is used for turning the image stabilizer “on”( | ), or “off”( o ).

Image stabilizer manner switch:
This switch is establish on many EF lenses that feature an paradigm stabilizer, peculiarly those of longer focal lengths. The switch has two settings on most lenses: Fashion 1 and Mode 2. The newest IS Mark II versions of certain EF super telephoto lenses (the 300mm f/2.8L,[6]
400mm f/2.8L,[seven]
500mm f/4L,[eight]
and 600mm f/4L[ix]), plus the 200–400mm f/4L IS[10]
and 100–400mm f/four–5.6L IS II,[11]
have a tertiary setting, Fashion iii. Manner i is normal mode, used for typical photography, where the subject area does non move. Mode 2 is used for panning; this is useful for sports or wild animals photography, where the subject moves constantly and one volition need to pan. Way 3, intended to rails activity, is similar to Way 2 in that information technology ignores panning; however, information technology but applies stabilization when the shutter is released—the viewfinder image is non stabilized.[9]
1 should not use Mode one for panning as this will typically cause blurred photographs; the paradigm stabilizer volition attempt to correct for all motility, including the panning motion, simply cannot do and so due to the limited range of motion of the IS mechanism. Older lenses that have an image stabilizer, simply do not feature this switch, are permanently in Mode ane. Some newer lenses, such as the Canon EF-South 18-200mm lens, are able to observe if they are being panned in either axis and volition automatically disable the stabilization for the axis parallel to motility and therefore do not require this switch.

Autofocus stop buttons:
These buttons are constitute on some super telephoto EF lenses, evenly spaced around the front neckband of the lens. They are used for temporarily stopping the autofocus feature of the lens. Just one button needs to be pressed to activate the feature. To use this button, one must first take the autofocus active, and so when ane wishes to halt autofocus, one presses and holds the push. To resume autofocus, ane releases the push button. Some newer bodies allow these buttons to be assigned to perform other functions; for instance, the Canon EOS 7D allows the photographer to set these buttons to perform any of six functions.

Focus preset:
The focus preset characteristic is plant on nigh super telephoto EF lenses. The focus preset feature uses one switch, one button, and 1 ring. It is used for presetting a given focus altitude into memory, so that the photographer can speedily call up the focus distance, without the need for autofocus. The switch has iii settings “off”( o ), “on”( | ), or “on with sound”( ((– ), and is used for turning on the feature, and deciding if audio is desired. The “set” push is used for saving the focus distance into memory. The focus preset ring is used for recalling the memory save betoken. It is a thin knurled ring, usually located in forepart of the
Focusing ring. To use this characteristic, ane must set the switch to either “on” or “on with sound”, focus the lens to the desired distance, then press the “fix” button. After this, when the characteristic is turned on, the lensman can turn the focus preset ring, and the lens will recall and focus quickly to the distance that was saved. This feature is useful for sports and birding photography (for instance, to allow rapid focusing on the goal or on a spot where the birds may perch).

Rear gel filter holder on an EF lens

Filter mounting:
This mountain is used for attaching filters to EF lenses. There are three types: front threaded mount, inner drop-in mount, and rear gelatin holders. Front threaded filters are used on most lenses, and are attached by threading and tightening the filter. Inner, drib-in filter mounts are used on super telephoto EF lenses. They are attached by start pressing the two buttons on the filter mount, and pulling it out. And so either a round threaded filter is attached, or i can use a gelatin filter. Rear gelatin filter holders are used by cutting out a canvas of gelatin, to the size shown on the back of the lens and and so sliding information technology into the holder. Filter mounts are useful for all types of photography, and every EF lens has either i or two of the three types used.

Lens hood mountain:
This feature is found on most EF lenses. This mountain is used for attaching the lens hood. The hood mount is of a bayonet mode on virtually EF lenses, though a clip-on style hood mount is used for a pocket-sized pick of current lenses.

Tripod collar:
This feature is found on most longer focal length lenses, and macro lenses. The tripod neckband is used for attaching the tripod band. There are two main styles of tripod rings. I type is opened up, placed on the lens’ tripod collar, then closed and tightened. The other type does non open, but instead is slid up the lens from the mount finish (which can only be done when the lens is not mounted on a camera body) and tightened. To ready the tripod ring then that it is level with the lens, rotate the ring until the index mark on the tripod ring matches the alphabetize mark on the distance calibration. The tripod ring is used for attaching a tripod/monopod almost to the bespeak of balance of the lens-body combination, more conveniently than the camera body. In the instance of larger and heavier lenses, there is also less strain on the lens mount if the body is supported past the tripod-mounted lens than if the lens were to be supported by a tripod-mounted body.


[edit]

Ultrasonic motor drive




[edit]

Ultrasonic motor (USM) lenses appeared with the introduction of the EF 300 mm
f/2.8L USM lens in 1987. Catechism was the showtime camera maker to successfully commercialise the USM technology. EF lenses equipped with USM drives accept fast, silent and precise autofocus operations, and consume less power compared to other AF drive motors.

There are 3 types of USMs:
band-type USM,
micromotor USM, and
Nano USM. Ring-blazon USM allows for full-time transmission focus (FT-M) operations without switching out of AF fashion. Micromotor USM is used to bring down the cost of the lens. It is possible to implement FT-K even with micromotor USM; withal, it requires additional mechanical components, and the vast majority of micro-USM lenses exercise non offer such capability. Nano USM was introduced in 2016 with the release of Canon’southward latest iteration of the EF-S 18–135mm lens. It is intended to offer the AF speed of ring-type USM with the quietness of STM mechanisms (see below).

Some older USM lenses are identified with a gilded ring and the word “Ultrasonic” printed in gold on the lens butt. 50 lenses with USM don’t take the aureate ring, but they still have the give-and-take “Ultrasonic” printed on the lens butt.

Stepping motor




[edit]

Catechism announced Stepping motor (STM) lenses outset in June 2012, alongside the EOS 650D/Rebel T4i/Kiss X6i.

Canon stated that this technology allows smooth and silent autofocus, and with compatible bodies (the showtime of which is the 650D) will provide continuous autofocus in live view and video.[12]
Unlike USM, STM lenses use focus-by-wire to enable full-time manual mode. Two primary disadvantages are linked to focus-by-wire: First, the need to computationally process the input before the intended action is executed leads to a sometimes perceptible lag. 2d, using the motor requires power, and so when an STM lens is not connected to a camera or the photographic camera is switched off, irresolute the focus is incommunicable.

All stepping-motor lenses are marked with the letters “STM” on the forepart of the lens as part of the model designation.

Image stabilizer



[edit]

The epitome stabilization (IS) technology detects handheld motion and optically corrects information technology. It only corrects handheld movement; if the subject of the photograph is moving, IS volition not stop it. It too can only stabilize so much motion, ranging from ii to five stops, depending on the specific IS in the lens. Canon has released several versions of the IS arrangement, including the following:

  • The first version, first used in the 75-300mm lens (1995), takes approximately ane 2d to stabilize, provides approximately ii stops of stability, is not suitable for use on a tripod, or for panning.
  • The 300mm
    f/4L IS USM lens, released in 1997, adds IS Way 2, which detects whether panning is taking place horizontally or vertically, and just compensates for vibration in the aeroplane perpendicular to the plane of panning.
  • In 1999, with the release of the IS super-telephoto lenses (300mm
    f/2.8L through 600mm
    f/4L), tripod detection was added, then that the lens could be used on a tripod with IS turned on.
  • In 2001, a new version of the Image Stabilizer was created for the lxx–200mm
    f/2.8L. This version takes approximately 0.5s and can exist stabilized upward to three stops.
  • In 2006, the 70–200 mm
    f/4L IS USM was released with an Image Stabilizer which allows up to four stops of stabilization.[13]
  • In 2008, the 200mm f/2L IS USM was released with a new version of IS which allows up to v stops of stabilization.[14]
  • In 2009, the 100 mm
    f/2.8L Macro IS USM became the first Canon lens with a Hybrid Image Stabilizer.[xv]
    In addition to correcting angular movement, Hybrid IS too corrects for shift movement.[16]
  • In 2011, with the release of the 300mm
    f/2.8L IS Ii and 400mm
    f/2.8L IS 2, IS Fashion three was added. This mode is similar to Manner 2, except that stabilization is applied merely when the shutter is released.
  • Some newer lenses include an Epitome Stabilizer which can automatically observe whether the user is panning and answer accordingly, and therefore these lenses do not have an IS style switch.

All EF lenses that support IS have the words “Image Stabilizer” written on the lens. On some of Canon’southward larger telephoto lenses, the words “Image Stabilizer” are etched onto a metallic plate affixed to the lens.

Diffractive optics

[edit]

The greenish-ringed EF 70–300 mm
f/4.5–5.6 Exercise IS USM

Diffractive optics (DO) are special lens elements that are used in some lenses. Exercise lenses are usually smaller and lighter and are improve at handling chromatic aberration, compared to conventional lenses of similar focal length and discontinuity value. They are more expensive to brand. Just the EF 400 mm
f/4 Practice IS USM, its updated Marker 2 version, and the EF 70–300 mm
f/4.five–5.6 DO IS USM contain Practise elements. DO lenses have a green ring on the butt.

L-series lenses

[edit]

Peak range Canon EF lenses are designated “L-serial”, or “Luxury” lenses.[17]
L series lenses are compatible with the full range of EF or EF-S mounts and, as they are aimed at the loftier-end user, almost also include environmental or atmospheric condition sealing and a constant maximum aperture. All 50 lenses are supplied complete with a hood and a pouch or case, which are not generally included with non-L lenses. Distinctive visual cues include a cherry band around the lens and an off-white color on longer-focal-length models. The latter also helps to reflect light and reduce heat absorption and subsequent internal expansion of lens components that can impact the paradigm quality of long focal length lenses.[18]

All L lenses include at least i fluorite, ultra-depression-dispersion glass chemical element, super ultra-depression-dispersion glass element, and/or certain types of aspherical elements. (Note that a number of non-Fifty lenses likewise employ aspherical element, and at least one non-50 lens has a Super UD element) Well-nigh Fifty lenses characteristic an ultrasonic motor (USM) for focusing.

Timeline of innovations

[edit]

In 1987 Catechism was the first to use USM (Ultra Sonic Motor) with the Canon EF 300mm f/ii.8L USM.[19]

In 1989 Canon was the showtime to create a full frame f/1.0 AF (AutoFocus) lens and the only i until today with the Catechism EF 50mm f/i.0L USM.

In 1993 Canon was the first to create an interchangeable 10× superzoom lens for SLR cameras. That lens was Canon EF 35-350mm f/3.v-5.6L USM.

In 1993 Canon created the kickoff Super UD (Ultra low Dispersion) lens with the Canon EF 400mm f/5.6L USM.

In 1995 Canon created the showtime lens with IS (Image Stabilization). That lens was the Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-five.half dozen IS USM.

Catechism in 2001 was the offset to create a lens with DO (multi layered Diffractive Optical element) chemical element. That lens was the Canon EF 400mm f/4 Practise IS USM.

Canon in 2008 created the commencement lens with SWC applied science (Subwavelentgh Structure Coating). That lens was the Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L 2 USM.

Canon in 2009 created the first lens with Hybrid IS (Image Stabilization) which compensates both bending camera shake and shift photographic camera shake with the Canon EF 100mm f/2.8L Macro IS USM.

Catechism in 2010 was the first to create a lens with Fluoride coating. That lens was the Canon EF seventy-300mm f/iv-v.6L IS USM.

Canon in 2011 made the start fisheye zoom lens, both round and rectangular. That lens was the Canon EF 8-15mm f/4L Fisheye USM.

Canon in 2012 made the get-go broad angle lens with Paradigm Stabilization. That lens was the Canon EF 24mm f/two.8 IS USM.

Canon in 2013 created the offset telephoto with born 1.4× extender. That lens was Canon EF 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Extender 1.4x.[xix]

Advice protocol

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The communication protocol betwixt the photographic camera and the lens is eight-data-scrap, 1-stop-scrap SPI (manner three). The pins, from right to left on the lens, are:

Catechism EF mountain pins[2]
[20]
Name Role Notes
VBat +6 Five to power internal lens focus motors Canon EF lens mount.jpg

Present on all EOS bodies and lenses

P-Gnd Power ground
P-Gnd
VDD +5.five V Digital logic power
DCL Data from camera to the lens (MOSI)
DLC Data from the lens to the camera (MISO)
LCLK Photographic camera body generated clock signal (SCLK, CPOL=1)
D-GND Digital logic ground
COM1 Teleconverter common[21]
[22]
[23]
Canon EF telephoto lens mount.jpg

Merely on most 50-serial and some macro lenses

EXT0 Brusque to COM1 for ‘Life Size Converter’ and 1.4× teleconverter
EXT1 Short to COM1 for 2× and 1.four× teleconverter

The information from the lens is used by the camera body for focusing and metering, and with digital photographic camera bodies it is used to record the lens parameters in the Exif data in the images.

All L series primes 135mm or longer, the 400mm DO, the 70–200mm zooms, the 100–400mm zooms, the 200–400mm zoom and the 50mm Compact Macro take three additional advice pins. These additional pins are used by the Canon Extender EF adapters and the
Life-Size Converter EF
to indicate to the lens the change in focal length so that information technology is able to report the correct focal length and aperture to the camera body when mounted on a teleconverter. The lens also reduces autofocus speed when a teleconverter is fastened to meliorate autofocus accurateness.

List of Canon EF lenses

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The “I”, “II”, “III” Roman numeral suffix later on the focal length(south) indicates the generation number. While I is used in the tabular array below, it is not used in official Canon model numbers; the original model lacks a Roman numeral and only the second and subsequent generations have them. Roman numerals are used only when the entire model designation—focal length(s), aperture, IS, DO, L condition, and motor machinery—is identical from one version to the adjacent. This ways, for example, that when Canon introduced IS to lenses whose prior versions lacked that characteristic (24mm, 28mm, 35mm IS primes in 2012, 16–35mm IS zoom in 2014), the get-go IS versions lacked Roman numerals.

The EF lenses are grouped below by their focal lengths:

  • Zoom: for zoom lenses that accept a range of focal lengths
  • Prime: for prime number lenses that have a single focal length

Zoom

[edit]

Focal length Aperture Introduction USM IS L-serial DO Filter size
8–xv mm

(fisheye)
f/iv 2010 Yes No Yes No rear
xi–24 mm f/four 2015 Yes No Yes No rear
16–35 mm I f/ii.8 2001 Yes No Yeah No 77 mm
xvi–35 mm II f/ii.8 2007 Yes No Aye No 82 mm
xvi–35 mm Iii f/two.8 2016 Yes No Yes No 82 mm
16–35 mm IS f/4 2014 Yeah Yes Yes No 77 mm
17–35 mm f/ii.8 1996 Yes No Yes No 77 mm
17–40 mm f/4 2003 Yes No Yes No 77 mm
20–35 mm f/2.eight 1989 No No Yes No 72 mm
xx–35 mm f/3.5–4.5 1993 Yeah No No No 77 mm
22–55 mm f/iv-5.vi 1998 Yes No No No 58 mm
24–70 mm f/2.eight 2002 Yes No Aye No 77 mm
24–lxx mm Ii f/2.8 2012 Yes No Yes No 82 mm
24–70 mm f/4 2012 Yep Yes Yeah No 77 mm
24–85 mm f/3.five-4.5 1996 Yes No No No 67 mm
24–105 mm f/4 2005 Aye Yep Yeah No 77 mm
24–105 mm II f/4 2016 Yeah Yes Yeah No 77 mm
24–105 mm STM f/three.5-v.6 2014 No Yes No No 77 mm
28–70 mm f/2.8 1993 Yes No Yes No 77 mm
28–70 mm II f/3.v-four.v 1988 No No No No 52 mm
28–80 mm f/2.8-4 1989 Yes No Yes No 72 mm
28–80 mm f/iii.5-v.6 1996 No No No No 58 mm
28–eighty mm 2 f/3.5-5.6 1999 No No No No 58 mm
28–fourscore mm I f/3.5-5.vi 1991 Yes No No No 58 mm
28–80 mm 2 f/3.five-five.6 1993 Yeah No No No 58 mm
28–80 mm 3 f/3.5-5.6 1995 Yes No No No 58mm
28–80 mm Four f/3.five-5.6 1996 Aye No No No 58 mm
28–80 mm V f/3.5-5.6 1999 Yes No No No 58 mm
28–ninety mm f/4-v.vi 2000 Aye No No No 58 mm
28–xc mm II f/4-5.6 2003 Yep No No No 58 mm
28–90 mm III f/4-5.six 2004 No No No No 58 mm
28–105 mm f/3.5-4.5 1992 Yes No No No 58 mm
28–105 mm Two f/3.v-4.5 2000 Yes No No No 58 mm
28–105 mm f/4-5.6 2002 Yes No No No 58 mm
28–135 mm f/three.5-5.6 1998 Aye Yes No No 72 mm
28–200 mm f/3.5-v.6 2000 Yes No No No 72 mm
28–200 mm f/3.5-5.6 2000 No No No No 72 mm
28–300 mm f/3.five-5.half dozen 2004 Yes Yeah Yep No 77 mm
35–70 mm f/iii.5-4.5 1987 No No No No 52 mm
35–70 mm f/3.5-four.5A 1988 No No No No 52 mm
35–fourscore mm III f/four-v.half-dozen 1995 No No No No 52 mm
35–lxxx mm f/4-5.six 1992 Yep No No No 52 mm
35–lxxx mm Power Zoom f/four-5.half-dozen 1990 Yes No No No 52 mm
35–105 mm f/3.5-4.v 1987 No No No No 58 mm
35–105 mm f/4.5-v.6 1992 Yep No No No 58 mm
35–135 mm f/3.5-4.5 1988 No No No No 58 mm
35–135 mm f/4-5.half dozen 1990 Aye No No No 58 mm
35–350 mm f/3.5-5.6 1993 Yes No Yes No 72 mm
38–76 mm f/4.5-five.six 1995 No No No No 52 mm
50–200 mm f/3.5-4.5 1987 No No No No 58 mm
50–200 mm f/three.five-4.5 1988 No No Yes No 58 mm
55–200 mm 2 f/4.5-5.6 2003 Aye No No No 52 mm
70–200 mm f/2.8 2001 Yes Yes Yes No 77 mm
70–200 mm Ii f/2.8 2010 Yes Yes Yeah No 77 mm
lxx–200 mm Three[24] f/2.8 2018 Aye Yes Yeah No 77 mm
70–200 mm f/two.8 1995 Yep No Yes No 77 mm
lxx–200 mm f/4 2006 Aye Yes Yes No 67 mm
70–200 mm Ii[24] f/four 2018 Aye Yes Yes No 72 mm
seventy–200 mm f/4 1999 Yes No Yes No 67 mm
70–210 mm f/3.five-iv.v 1990 Yes No No No 58 mm
70–210 mm f/4 1987 No No No No 58 mm
seventy–300 mm f/4.5-5.6 2004 Yeah Yep No Aye 58 mm
70–300 mm f/four-5.6 2005 Yeah Yep No No 58 mm
70–300 mm f/4-5.half-dozen 2010 Yes Yes Yeah No 67 mm[25]
lxx–300  mm II f/four-5.half-dozen 2016 Yes Yes No No 67 mm[26]
75–300 mm f/4-five.vi 1995 Yep Aye No No 58 mm
75–300 mm II f/4-5.6 1991 No No No No 58 mm
75–300 mm III f/four-v.6 1999 Yes No No No 58 mm
80–200 mm f/2.8 1989 No No Yes No 72 mm
fourscore–200 mm f/4.v-5.vi 1992 Yep No No No 52 mm
80–200 mm Two f/iv.5-five.half-dozen 1990 No No No No 52 mm
ninety–300 mm f/4.5-5.6 2003 No No No No 58 mm
xc–300 mm f/4.5-5.vi 2002 Yes No No No 58 mm
100–200 mm f/four.5A 1988 No No No No 58 mm
100–300 mm f/4.5-5.six 1990 Yep No No No 58 mm
100–300 mm f/5.half-dozen 1987 No No No No 58 mm
100–300 mm f/5.vi 1987 No No Yes No 58 mm
100–400 mm f/4.5-5.6 1998 Yes Aye Yeah No 77 mm
100–400 mm 2 f/4.5-5.half-dozen 2014 Yes Yes Yes No 77 mm
200–400 mm f/iv 2013 Yes Yeah Yes No 52 mm rear

Two EF lenses and an EF-S lens (middle).

Prime

[edit]

Focal length Discontinuity Introduction Macro USM IS Fifty-series Exercise Filter size
14 mm f/ii.8 1991 No Yeah No Aye No gel
14 mm Ii f/2.8 2007 No Yes No Yes No gel
15 mm

(fisheye)
f/2.8 1987 No No No No No gel
20 mm f/two.viii 1992 No Yes No No No 72 mm
24 mm f/ane.iv 1997 No Yes No Yes No 77 mm
24 mm II f/1.4 2008 No Yes No Yes No 77 mm
24 mm f/2.8 1988 No No No No No 58 mm
24 mm IS f/two.viii 2012 No Yes Yes No No 58 mm
28 mm f/1.viii 1995 No Yes No No No 58 mm
28 mm f/2.8 1987 No No No No No 52 mm
28 mm IS f/ii.8 2012 No Yes Aye No No 58 mm
35 mm f/1.4 1998 No Yes No Aye No 72 mm
35 mm II f/1.iv 2015 No Yep No Yes No 72 mm
35 mm f/2 1990 No No No No No 52 mm
35 mm IS f/2 2012 No Yes Yes No No 67 mm
40 mm f/ii.8 2012 No No No No No 52 mm
50 mm f/i 1989 No Aye No Yeah No 72 mm
50 mm f/1.two 2006 No Yes No Yep No 72 mm
l mm f/one.4 1993 No Aye No No No 58 mm
50 mm f/1.8 1987 No No No No No 52 mm
l mm Two f/1.8 1990 No No No No No 52 mm
50 mm STM f/ane.8 2015 No No No No No 49 mm
50 mm f/2.v 1987 Yeah[a] No No No No 52 mm
65 mm f/2.8 1999 Yes No No No No 58 mm
85 mm f/ane.2 1989 No Yes No Yes No 72 mm
85 mm Two f/1.two 2006 No Yes No Yes No 72 mm
85 mm IS[27] f/1.4 2017 No Yes Yes Aye No 77 mm
85 mm f/1.viii 1992 No Yes No No No 58 mm
100 mm f/2 1991 No Yep No No No 58 mm
100 mm f/2.8 1990 Yep No No No No 58 mm
100 mm f/two.8 2000 Yes Yeah No No No 58 mm
100 mm f/2.8 2009 Yes Yeah Yes Yeah No 67 mm
135 mm f/2 1996 No Yes No Yes No 72 mm
135 mm

Soft Focus
f/2.eight 1987 No No No No No 52 mm
180 mm f/3.5 1996 Yes No No Yeah No 72 mm
200 mm f/1.8 1988 No Yes No Yeah No 48 mm rear
200 mm f/two 2008 No Yes Yeah Yes No 52 mm rear
200 mm f/two.8 1991 No Yes No Yeah No 72 mm
200 mm II f/2.8 1996 No Yes No Yep No 72 mm
300 mm f/1.8 Unknown Un­known Yeah United nations­known Aye United nations­known Unknown
300 mm f/2.eight 1987 No Aye No Yes No 48 mm rear
300 mm IS f/ii.8 1999 No Aye Yes Yeah No 52 mm rear
300 mm IS Ii f/two.viii 2010 No Yes Yeah Yes No 52 mm rear
300 mm f/4 1991 No Yes No Yep No 77 mm
300 mm IS f/4 1997 No Yes Yes Yep No 77 mm
400 mm f/2.viii 1991 No Yes No Yes No 48 mm rear
400 mm II f/2.eight 1996 No Yeah No Yep No 48 mm rear
400 mm IS f/ii.8 1999 No Yes Yes Yes No 52 mm rear
400 mm IS II f/2.8 2011 No Aye Yeah Yes No 52 mm rear
400 mm IS Iii f/2.8 2018 No Yes Yeah Yes No 52 mm rear
400 mm f/iv 2001 No Yes Yes No Yes 52 mm rear
400 mm 2 f/4 2014 No Yes Yes No Yes 52 mm rear
400 mm f/v.six 1993 No Yes No Yes No 77 mm
500 mm f/4.five 1992 No Yep No Yes No 48 mm rear
500 mm IS f/4 1999 No Yep Yes Yep No 52 mm rear
500 mm IS Ii f/4 2011 No Yep Yes Yep No 52 mm rear
600 mm f/4 1988 No Yes No Yes No 48 mm rear
600 mm IS f/iv 1999 No Aye Yeah Yes No 52 mm rear
600 mm IS II f/four 2011 No Yes Yes Yes No 52 mm rear
600 mm IS III f/four 2018 No Yes Yes Yep No 52 mm rear
800 mm f/5.half-dozen 2008 No Yes Yep Yes No 52 mm rear
1200 mm f/5.6 1993 No Yep No Yes No 48 mm rear

  1. ^

    0.5× magnification but. When paired with the “Life-Size Converter EF”, a separate accompaniment, the lens provides upwards to 1.0× magnification but at the loss of infinity focus.

Exceptions

[edit]

Canon has two further types of lenses compatible with the EF mount: Tilt-shift and the 1-5x Macro lens, which are not designated EF, just TS-Due east and MP-E respectively. TS stands for Tilt-shift while MP stands for macro-photograph. These types of lenses are not designated EF every bit they are transmission-focus only lenses. They do, however, retain electronic aperture control as well as focus confirmation.

Special

[edit]

Focal length Discontinuity Introduction Macro USM IS L-serial Tilt–Shift Filter size
TS-E 17 mm f/4.0 2009 No No No Yes Yes none
TS-Due east 24 mm f/iii.5 1991 No No No Yes Yes 72 mm
TS-E 24 mm II f/3.5 2009 No No No Yes Yeah 82 mm
TS-Eastward 45 mm f/ii.8 1991 No No No No Yes 72 mm
TS-Due east 50 mm MACRO f/2.viii 2017 Yeah No No Yes Aye 77 mm
MP-E 65 mm Macro f/2.8 1999 Yes No No No No 58 mm
TS-E 90 mm f/ii.8 1991 No No No No Yes 58 mm
TS-E 90 mm Macro f/2.8 2017 Aye No No Yeah Yes 77 mm
TS-E 135 mm MACRO f/4.0 2017 Yes No No Yes Aye 82 mm

See as well

[edit]

  • Catechism FD lens mount
  • Catechism EF-S lens mountain
  • Canon EF-M lens mount
  • Canon RF mount

Notes

[edit]


  1. ^


    Eric Reagan (30 April 2014). “Catechism Surpasses 100 Million EF Lenses Produced”.
    Photography Bay.


  2. ^


    a




    b




    “History Hall 1987-1991”.
    Canon Camera Museum
    . Retrieved
    23 June
    2017
    .



  3. ^

    W.J. Markerink maintains an excellent commodity on
    Camera Mounts & Registers
    which gives much more detail most flange focal distances and lens compatibility.

  4. ^


    “Put Your Creativity into Motion with the New EOS Thousand Digital Photographic camera” (Press release). Canon United states of americaA., Inc. 23 July 2012. Retrieved
    23 July
    2012
    .



  5. ^


    NK Guy (half-dozen January 2007). “Role III – Lenses”.
    Canon EOS Beginners’ FAQ. Archived from the original on 22 December 2011.



  6. ^


    Carnathan, Bryan (10 Nov 2011). “Canon EF 300mm f/2.eight L IS II USM Lens Review”. The-Digital-Picture.com. Retrieved
    22 April
    2013
    .



  7. ^


    Carnathan, Bryan. “Catechism EF 400mm f/2.viii L IS II USM Lens Review”. The-Digital-Picture.com. Retrieved
    22 April
    2013
    .



  8. ^


    Carnathan, Bryan (26 September 2012). “Catechism EF 500mm f/iv L IS Two USM Lens Review”. The-Digital-Picture.com. Retrieved
    22 April
    2013
    .


  9. ^


    a




    b




    Carnathan, Bryan (27 September 2012). “Canon EF 600mm f/4 50 IS II USM Lens Review”. The-Digital-Picture show.com. Retrieved
    22 Apr
    2013
    .



  10. ^


    Carnathan, Bryan (18 November 2013). “Canon EF 200-400mm f/four L IS USM Extender i.4x Lens Review”. The-Digital-Picture.com. Retrieved
    11 January
    2014
    .



  11. ^


    “Canon The statesA. Introduces New Super-Telephoto Zoom Lens, The Compact And Highly Mobile Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-v.6L IS Two USM” (Press release). Canon U.S.A. ten November 2014. Retrieved
    11 November
    2014
    .



  12. ^


    “The New EOS Rebel T4i DSLR Camera Puts The Power And Inventiveness of DSLR Stills And Video at Your Fingertips” (Press release). Catechism United states of americaA., Inc. 8 June 2012. Retrieved
    8 June
    2012
    .



  13. ^


    “EF70-200mm f/4L IS USM”.
    Canon Camera Museum. Catechism. Retrieved
    23 June
    2017
    .



  14. ^


    “Canon Camera Museum 124; Technology Hall”. Canon.com. Archived from the original on 5 January 2012. Retrieved
    x June
    2013
    .



  15. ^


    “Canon announces the arrival of the outset EF lens to feature Hybrid IS”. Dpreview.com. Retrieved
    ten June
    2013
    .



  16. ^


    “New Canon Hybrid IS world’s showtime Paradigm Stabilizer to compensate for ii types of camera shake”. Dpreview.com. Retrieved
    10 June
    2013
    .



  17. ^


    Canon. “EF Lens System”. Archived from the original on 18 February 2009. Retrieved
    1 August
    2008
    .



  18. ^


    “Lenses: Blackness or white lenses?”.
    Canon Europe.


  19. ^


    a




    b




    “75 years of optics – Explore the world of Canon optics”.
    glassfirst.usa.canon.com. Archived from the original on 8 February 2015. Retrieved
    15 January
    2022
    .



  20. ^


    “Photograph.cyberspace: Canon EF focusing protocol”. Retrieved
    12 Jan
    2009
    .



  21. ^


    “Canon Extender EF 1.4x Parts Itemize”
    (PDF)
    . Retrieved
    21 September
    2018
    .



  22. ^


    “Catechism Extender EF ii.0x Parts Catalog”
    (PDF)
    . Retrieved
    21 September
    2018
    .



  23. ^


    “Canon Life Size Converter Parts Catalog”
    (PDF)
    . Retrieved
    5 April
    2009
    .



    [
    permanent dead link
    ]


  24. ^


    a




    b




    “Canon Updates Lineup of EF L-Series Telephoto Zoom Lenses With the Introduction of EF 70-200MM F/4L II USM and EF seventy-200MM F/2.8L IS Two USM”.
    united states.canon.com.



  25. ^


    Catechism. “Canon EF seventy-300mm f/4-5.6L IS USM Specification”. Retrieved
    7 May
    2015
    .



  26. ^


    Catechism. “EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS 2 USM”. Retrieved
    16 September
    2016
    .



  27. ^


    “Catechism UsA. Expands Its Lens Portfolio with the New EF 85mm F/one.4L IS USM Lens And Their First-Always Macro Tilt-Shift Lenses” (Press release). Canon The statesA., Inc. 29 Baronial 2017. Retrieved
    thirty August
    2017
    .


References

[edit]

  • Markerink, Willem-Jan.
    Camera Mounts & Registers. Retrieved on vi November 2005.
  • tiffen.com.
    Lens To Filter Nautical chart. For list of filter sizes.

External links

[edit]

  • EF Lenses at the Catechism Camera Museum
  • List of all Canon SLR lenses with technical specifications

  1. ^


    Rumors, Canon (viii April 2021). “Catechism officially discontinues a lot more EF lenses”.
    Catechism Rumors – Your best source for Catechism rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    ix April
    2021
    .



  2. ^


    Rumors, Canon (12 Apr 2021). “Canon discontinues the EF 100mm f/2 USM and EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM”.
    Canon Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    12 Apr
    2021
    .



  3. ^


    Rumors, Canon (8 April 2021). “Canon officially discontinues a lot more EF lenses”.
    Canon Rumors – Your all-time source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    9 April
    2021
    .



  4. ^


    Rumors, Catechism (30 March 2021). “Catechism EF 40mm f/two.8 STM officially discontinued”.
    Canon Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    9 Apr
    2021
    .



  5. ^


    Rumors, Catechism (31 March 2021). “Canon EF 70-200mm f/4L IS II USM & Canon EF 85mm f/one.2L USM II Discontinued”.
    Catechism Rumors – Your all-time source for Catechism rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    9 April
    2021
    .



  6. ^


    Rumors, Canon. “Recently Discontinued EF lenses”.
    Canon Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    23 Apr
    2021
    .



  7. ^


    Rumors, Catechism (12 Apr 2021). “Canon discontinues the EF 100mm f/2 USM and EF 24mm f/2.8 IS USM”.
    Canon Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    12 Apr
    2021
    .



  8. ^


    Rumors, Canon (8 April 2021). “Canon officially discontinues a lot more EF lenses”.
    Canon Rumors – Your all-time source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    9 April
    2021
    .



  9. ^


    Rumors, Catechism (viii Apr 2021). “Canon officially discontinues a lot more EF lenses”.
    Catechism Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    9 Apr
    2021
    .



  10. ^


    Rumors, Canon (19 March 2021). “Is the EF purge beginning? The EF 200mm f/2L IS USM is now listed as discontinued”.
    Catechism Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    nine April
    2021
    .



  11. ^


    Rumors, Catechism (viii April 2021). “Canon officially discontinues a lot more than EF lenses”.
    Catechism Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    nine April
    2021
    .



  12. ^


    Rumors, Canon. “Recently Discontinued EF lenses”.
    Catechism Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    23 Apr
    2021
    .



  13. ^


    Rumors, Canon (eight Apr 2021). “Canon officially discontinues a lot more EF lenses”.
    Canon Rumors – Your all-time source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    9 April
    2021
    .



  14. ^


    Rumors, Canon. “Recently Discontinued EF lenses”.
    Canon Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    23 April
    2021
    .



  15. ^


    Rumors, Canon (8 April 2021). “Canon officially discontinues a lot more EF lenses”.
    Canon Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    9 April
    2021
    .



  16. ^


    Rumors, Canon. “Recently Discontinued EF lenses”.
    Catechism Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    23 April
    2021
    .



  17. ^


    Rumors, Canon (eight April 2021). “Canon officially discontinues a lot more EF lenses”.
    Canon Rumors – Your best source for Catechism rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    nine Apr
    2021
    .



  18. ^


    Rumors, Canon. “Recently Discontinued EF lenses”.
    Catechism Rumors – Your best source for Catechism rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    23 April
    2021
    .



  19. ^


    Rumors, Catechism (eight Apr 2021). “Canon officially discontinues a lot more than EF lenses”.
    Canon Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    9 Apr
    2021
    .



  20. ^


    Rumors, Canon (viii April 2021). “Canon officially discontinues a lot more than EF lenses”.
    Catechism Rumors – Your best source for Canon rumors, leaks and gossip
    . Retrieved
    nine April
    2021
    .




Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_EF_lens_mount