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By | 13/10/2022

Canon 8-15mm f/4L Fisheye review: showtime pictures

Canon fisheye lens



See images shot with the new Canon viii-15mm Fisheye L lens

Nosotros’ve been putting Catechism’s new ultra wide bending 8-15mm Fisheye zoom lens to the test. While we get on with the review, we thought we’d share some of the images that nosotros’ve captured with the new lens, equally well equally share some initial comments on its performance.

The Canon 8-15mm f/4L Fisheye lens was announced dorsum in August 2010 as the world’southward commencement fisheye zoom lens offering both circular and full frame images. Release of the lens was delayed because of the earthquake in Japan before in the year, simply is now available for around £600 (street price).

Here are some of the start pictures we have shot with the lens, along with some initial thoughts on performance.

Canon fisheye lens

Click here to encounter a high-res version.

The lens allows you to focus extremely closely to your discipline. In this paradigm, we were only shooting with the forepart element only just over an inch from the sunflower. This epitome was shot on a full frame Canon EOS 5D Mark 2, with the lens at 8mm.

Canon fisheye lens

Click hither to run into a high-res version.

Because the lens offers such a wide field of view, information technology’s like shooting fish in a barrel to accidentally include yourself in the shot. In this image, you can see reviewer Jeff Morgan’southward elbow and feet. This image was shot on a total frame Canon EOS 5D Mark Two, with the lens at 8mm.

Canon fisheye lens

Click hither to see a high-res version.

This paradigm was shot using a Catechism EOS 5D Mark Ii. Using a full-frame camera, you will get a fully round image when the lens is used at 8mm.

When shooting at the widest bending, you’ll notice a blue edging around the circle. It doesn’t look as well bad when the frame includes a blue sky, but with other subjects it can appear a little distracting.

Canon fisheye

Click here to come across a loftier-res version.

When used at 10mm (again using a total frame camera), the image is shown with circular sides but with the tiptop and bottom of the circle cutting off. At this length, the image isn’t actually that useful, unless you desire to ingather to only include the middle of the frame.

Canon fisheye

Click here to see a loftier-res version.

Even at 14mm (on a full frame camera once more), you volition nonetheless meet some elements of vignetting at the corners, so over again information technology’s wise to only use the eye of the epitome.

Canon fisheye

Click hither to see a high-res version.

At fully zoomed (15mm), the lens captures the whole of the scene up to the edge of the frame. This ways that in exercise, on a full-frame camera such equally the 5D, the lens is nigh usable at fully broad, or fully zoomed.

Canon fisheye

Click here to see a high-res version.

The viii-15mm lens performs well shooting directly into the sun, with little to no loss of contrast, ghosting or flare. Cyan magenta fringing can be seen on high contrast edges, such as on the lighthouse.

Canon fisheye

Click here to see a loftier-res version.

You tin can see in this 100% crop where the fringing is evident. Yous should be able to remove this type of fringing when processing in the raw converter though.

Canon fisheye

Click here to run into a loftier-res version.

Considering the depth of field is and so large, yous need to be careful of anything that appears on the front element of the lens. In this picture, a stray raindrop can exist seen.

Canon fisheye 15mm

This paradigm was taken on an APS-C sized photographic camera, the Canon EOS 7D, with the lens fix at 15mm. On a crop sensor camera you have an first-class quality 10mm to 15mm zoom lens does not sound like a big range but information technology really is!

Canon fisheye

Click here to run into a high-res version.

This image was taken on a Canon EOS 7D, with the lens shot at 10mm.

Canon fisheye

Click here to see a high-res version.

This image was shot on a 7D at 8mm. At offset expect this may non be a very useful setting with the vignetting, but about panorama software volition catechumen iv of these images each shot at 90 degrees to each other into a not bad seamless 360 degree panorama.

All images © Jeff Morgan.

Amy has been writing nigh cameras, photography and associated tech since 2009. Amy was once part of the photography testing team for Future Publishing working across TechRadar, Digital Photographic camera, PhotoPlus, North Photograph and Photography Week. For her photography, she has won awards and has been exhibited. She often partakes in unusual projects – including one intense year where she used a dissimilar camera every single day. Amy is currently the Features Editor at Amateur Photographer mag, and in her increasingly piffling spare time works across a number of high-contour publications including Wired, Stuff, Digital Camera Globe, Skillful Reviews, and just a little off-tangent, PetsRadar.

Source: https://www.techradar.com/uk/news/photography-video-capture/cameras/canon-8-15mm-f-4l-fisheye-review-first-pictures-995423