How Many Exposures On 35mm Film

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  • #i

Why do 35mm picture show rolls come in 24 or 36 exposures? I’ve seen some rollls of 12 exposures, merely majority is 24/36. Is there some historical significance to this? I would call up putting a gyre of 42 or l exposures in a roll would be much meliorate on the environment since at that place’ll be less packaging used per curlicue. And each roll would last longer in the field besides, especially in locations which flick is hard to obtain.


  • #2

They used to be 20 exposures as well, and it changed to 24 at some phase.
I think it’south a mix of convenience and pattern constraints, you can merely fit then many exposures inside a cartridge, and 24 or 32 exposures make it manageable to have photos and change film when you need to. If yous take 50 exposures a whorl and y’all change field of study affair and you need a faster emulsion, you may be throwing away 20 exposures so you tin can change flick.
That’s my accept on information technology, but someone else may have some more than historically logical input.

Ole

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  • #three

36 exposures plus leader is almost the most that will fit in the cartridge. With a short leader y’all may be able to fit 40, just that won’t work with all cameras.

Andy K

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  • #4

I think you lot would find a 42 or l frame roll too many frames. I even detect 36 frames too many and tend to load a maximum of 20 frames these days. Majority loading is easier on the environment than buying rolls.

If I am going somewhere abroad from a film supply I have at to the lowest degree twice the amount of film I think I will actually require. I take information technology in the form of a couple of majority loaders and a hundred or so cassettes. Meliorate to behave as well much and bring it back unexposed than non enough.

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  • #five

36 exposures plus leader is most the nearly that will fit in the cartridge. With a short leader y’all may be able to fit 40, just that won’t work with all cameras.

You can make 40 exp films with a bulk loader, but beyond that the cassette is so full you risk scratching the film. Ilford used to make 72 exp films on a special thin base, but they curled like crazy, had depth of focus issues and were a pig to process and dry. I guess 36 is three dozen and so a multiple on the average 12 on 120 of roll film cameras when Leica developed 35mm as a still format.

David.

MattKing


  • #6

It was a fairly major change when slide film went from 20 to 24 exposures – a significant amount of my Kodachrome experience was with 20 exposure rolls.

Of course, if y’all really wanted more pictures per roll than, you lot could always purchase an Olympus Pen, and work with half frame (upwardly to 72 exposures per ringlet). Your photofinisher would non, all the same, be particularly happy about it.

Matt

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  • #7

I call back y’all would find a 42 or 50 frame roll too many frames. I fifty-fifty find 36 frames too many and tend to load a maximum of twenty frames these days. Bulk loading is easier on the environment than buying rolls.

Like Andy, for more serious B/W work I find 24 exp ideal as with the kind of field of study thing I prefer I’d be unlikely to take more than about that number at ane location. However, for color slides I’d commonly go for 36 exp, as 24s become proportionally much more than expensive per frame and I’d live with leaving a film in the photographic camera until it was finished at a later session.

In that location’s also the issue of developing more than 36 exps. My reels volition have 40 at a stretch, but are there reels for more (other than cine) ?

Steve

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  • #8

years ago, ilford came out with a 72 exposure ringlet. THe base was very thin and a bit tricky to work with, simply peachy for sports work.

However, information technology didn’t last long every bit the commerical folks had difficulties with the sparse base and the machines (or so i was told).

except for the curling issues i beloved the stuff lol

I recently sold the tanks used to hold that length of picture show, which was a surprise, but and so one never knows what volition happen on ebay
:smile:

copake_ham

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  • #9

As I do not bulk load – my preferences in the past were for 36exp. because of the better price/exposure ratio.

Merely I’m more than and more than desiring to shoot 24exp. rolls considering I find that equally I become older – I take more time and make fewer shots (I similar to think this is maturity – but perhaps in only senility
:wink:
).

The other day I grabbed a “iv pack plus” of some Fuji Superia from the checkout rack at Target. Information technology had 4 rolls of 24exp. with a “bonus” roll of 36exp.

While it’due south just “consumer” course” at $7.77 for the pack I thought it was a good bargain and a good way to get some 24exp. (admitting, color) film.
:smile:

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  • #ten

The shorter 12-ish exposure rolls were commonly refered to as “reporter rolls”. They could exist used one per assignment. I tin remember seeing some Kodacolor and definately Tri-x labled equally such. Besides seen a few short rolls labeled for “law enforcement use”.

Lee L

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  • #11

The other trouble with greater than 36 exposures, particularly for working photographers with the Ilford 72 frame movie, is the camera’s frame counter. At a glance you can tell that y’all take somewhere betwixt null and 34 exposures left. Is information technology time to change movie while things are slow? I seem to call up that at least one trunk came out during that time with a much larger frame count, simply can’t recall which.

Lee

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  • #12

The original Leica prototype was darkroom loaded and took (IIRC) l frames. When they introduced cassettes, the virtually they could conveniently make it was 36.

Initially there were 18-exposure one-half-rolls, simply these were lengthened to xx every bit a marketing ploy (much as 120 went from vi to 8 frames) and so to 24-exposure perhaps 20 years ago. This left no short rolls so the 12-ringlet was brought out…

At that place’due south more detail in my
A History of the 35mm Nevertheless Camera
(Focal Printing c. 1984) just that’s basically it.

Thanks,

R.

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  • #13

The original Leica prototype was darkroom loaded and took (IIRC) 50 frames. When they introduced cassettes, the near they could conveniently get in was 36.

Initially there were 18-exposure half-rolls, but these were lengthened to xx every bit a marketing ploy (much as 120 went from half dozen to eight frames) and then to 24-exposure maybe twenty years ago. This left no short rolls so the 12-gyre was brought out…

There’s more detail in my
A History of the 35mm Even so Camera
(Focal Printing c. 1984) but that’s basically it.

Cheers,

R.

Didn`t Ilford once introduce a 72 exposure roll of their HP5 film?
This I believe, wasn`t peculiarly successful and was soon discontinued.

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  • #14

I guess the size of the cassette would limit the number of exposures. It’s just that I see photojournalists/documentary photographers in countries where at that place’southward no electricity/computer access having more convenience shooting with longer rolls than 36 exposures.

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  • #xv

I remember seeing Kodak 72 exp. rolls at the grocery store many years ago.

Michel Hardy-Vallée

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  • #16

My Spotmatic F has reminders for 20exp and 36exp rolls.

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  • #17

Didn`t Ilford once introduce a 72 exposure roll of their HP5 flick?
This I believe, wasn`t peculiarly successful and was soon discontinued.

I didn`t come across the previous post past Lee L. (Sorry).:surprised:

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  • #18

My Spotmatic F has reminders for 20exp and 36exp rolls.

the frame count was inverse in the late 70s, I never figured out why 24 rather than 20, I thought (this is what I get for thinking) at the fourth dimension that 20 and 40 would have more than sense. I have still have 20 frame SS reels.

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  • #19

I remember seeing Kodak 72 exp. rolls at the grocery shop many years agone.

I remember you lot may be misremembering.

Yes, 72 frames are possible with a thin polyester base, as Ilford illustrated, but I don’t think Kodak always did it. Tin PE enlighten united states?

Cheers,

R.

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  • #20

kodak sells multipacks with the full number of exposures in the pack on the label, so seeing 72 or 96 exposures is possible.

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  • #21

I wonder why it is still possible to get cassettes of Fuji Superia in 12 frame cassettes? vii dayshop in the Aqueduct Islands often stock information technology only I don’t think I have e’er seen it in Kodak colour or in any make of B&W flick.

For those with one camera and looking to change from B&W to colour on one day’due south shooting at ane site or those trying to shoot all frames in i set of light weather, I can see 12 frame cassettes in B&W being useful.

A bit similar the usefulness of paper at 5 x 7.5 inches simply I’ve been down at that place already.

pentaxuser

pentaxuser

David A. Goldfarb

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  • #22

I wonder why it is still possible to get cassettes of Fuji Superia in 12 frame cassettes? seven dayshop in the Channel Islands often stock it but I don’t think I have e’er seen information technology in Kodak colour or in any make of B&W pic.

That way, those guys who used to take three Christmases on the aforementioned coil can cease the roll right later on New year’s day’s and see the prints right away.

eddym

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  • #23

Speaking of majority curlicue loading of cassettes… anybody remember majority load backs for cameras? Weren’t they something similar 500 exposures?

I remember once when I was shooting runners back in the belatedly 70’s, I was at a race and saw another photographer shooting a Nikon F2 with motordrive and a 135mm f2 lens. I wonder at present how long he could concord that thing upwards to shoot…?

Me, I was shooting a squeamish lightweight: Pentax MX with winder and 85mm f2. Information technology was tiny in comparision with the Nikon!

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  • #24

HP5 at one time came in 12 exposure rolls.

and lee, yep, with regard to the 72 exposure rolls, it was a bit of a lottery to know when i was nearing the end of the curlicue every bit the photographic camera stop counting at 36.

if i recollect correctly i just let the camera warn me, as it would stop advancing the flick.

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  • #25

from what i call up people in the real manor business organisation used to utilise the 12 exposure rolls as well.

i still get/employ 48 and 72 exposure rolls of all my favorite 35mm film, but i have to load my pen F
:wink:

-john

Source: https://www.photrio.com/forum/threads/why-24-or-36-exposures-per-roll-of-35mm.27033/